French Drain Information, French Drain Tips, French Drain as part of a Drainage System, Part 1 —

Posted: February 7, 2020 in Drainage System, Drainage Systems, french drain
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French Drains and Surface Drains as part of Drainage Systems

This is a series of blogs that first explains exactly what French Drains and Surface Drains are,  and how they are used in a Drainage System.

Next, I will explain exactly what the benefits and drawbacks are of each type of drain and why you would use one type of drain over another in many different situations.

Last, I will explain the specifics of how to install your own Drainage System and how to diagnose exactly what type of system you need in the first place.

At the top and  bottom of every blog in this series will be a listing of all the connecting blogs that you can “Click” on to easily move back and forth through the series.

Next Blog

A French Drain is just a part of a Drainage System.  Many people refer to basically any type of Drain in or around their home as a French Drain.  This actually in not correct.

Gutter to French Drain

Connecting Gutter to French Drain

Before you can really understand what a French Drain is, you first must be familiar with a Drainage System and what it involves.

A Drainage System has three parts.  It has an “Intake” to bring water into the Drainage System.  It is placed in a low area where water is standing or is in area where water sometimes runs across it over the surface or under the surface or both.  An “Intake” will be a French Drain, Surface Drain or Sump Pump.

In a Simple Drainage System there will only be One “Intake.”  In a Complex Drainage System there will be several Intakes.  They may vary in type and size.  For Example, You may have a Drainage System with a Surface Drain, and a French Drain and a Sump Pump all as separate  Intakes in the Drainage System.  The Intakes will vary in number and type depending on what water issues you are trying to fix.

The “Transition” is the second part of the Drainage System which is the Drain Pipe that moves the water out of the area that is flooded.  It is your water “High Way, ” as it were.  Typically there are two types of Transition Drain Pipes that will be covered later.

Finally you have an “Exit” which releases the water from the drainage system.  It must be in an area that is lower than the French Drain or Surface Drain that is you “Intake.”

 

connecting down spout

Connecting Gutter Down Spout to French Drain Under Sidewalk

A French Drain  is a perforated pipe that is basically full of slits or holes.  A trench is dug across the problem drainage area.  The dirt from the trench is hauled away.  The perforated pipe is placed in the trench.  The Drainage trench is dug deep enough so that the perforated French Drain Pipe is several inches below ground level when placed in the trench.  Next gravel or some type of crushed stone is placed on top and around the French Drain perforated pipe until the trench is full.

 

Once a French Drain is completed you will see gravel on the surface in a place where dirt use to be.

A French Drain is designed to take in and move a large amount of water.  It covers a large area with water standing on or moving across the area.  It needs to have some “Slope” or “Fall” to drain the water.  The pipe needs to run down hill to the exit point to release it from the Drainage System.  If it is up hill in all directions from the French Drain then there is a problem.  We all know that water will not flow up hill.  Some times this can be overcome when it is only slightly up hill by digging the trench deeper as you go up hill.  Still the exit point in the Drainage System must be lower than the French Drain where the water is taken into the drainage system, or the water will never drain.

In conclusion, a French Drain is a perforated Pipe in a trench covered in gravel.  It is the “Intake” part of a Drainage System.  It covers a wide area and needs to be higher than the exit point of the Drainage System.

This is the first in a series of blogs about French Drains and all other types of Drains as well.  If you would like to learn more just Click on the “Next Blog” below.

Next Drain Blog

Comments
  1. […] French Drain Information, French Drain Tips, French Drain as part of a Drainage System, Part 1 February 7, 2020French Drains and Surface Drains as part of Drainage Systems This is a series of blogs that first explains exactly what French Drains and Surface Drains are,  and how they are used in a Drainage System. Next, I will explain exactly what the benefits and drawbacks are of each type of drain and why you […] blanecallen […]

  2. […] French Drain Information, French Drain Tips, French Drain as part of a Drainage System, Part 1 February 7, 2020French Drains and Surface Drains as part of Drainage Systems This is a series of blogs that first explains exactly what French Drains and Surface Drains are,  and how they are used in a Drainage System. Next, I will explain exactly what the benefits and drawbacks are of each type of drain and why you […] blanecallen […]

  3. […] you have the need for a six inch Drain Pipe,  that means you have a lot of water to move.  You don’t want to create a bottle neck at […]

  4. […] Drains and all types of Drainage Systems involves digging Drainage Trenches and Installing Drain Pipes.  One issue that must be addressed […]

  5. […] Oklahoma Drainage and Sprinkler Repair installed a large 6 inch French Drain in Edmond.  The customer had water running under his back porch step and into his basement.  We did a Free […]

  6. […] Installing a Drainage System, What kind of Drain Pipe do you use and what size Drain Pipe Do you […]

  7. […] it.  A “Thatch Filter ” is made up of the grass that covers the French Drain.  The French Drain then has two filters.  First is the Neo-Prene Soc that comes around the Perforated French Drain […]

  8. […]              4.  The amount of gravel or limestone or River Rock used to Cover the 6 inch French Drain is Much larger   All things being considered, the performance and longevity of a 6 inch French […]

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